tips for gay and lesbian travelers in morocco

Homosexuality is considered relatively common, though rarely acknowledged, amongst Moroccan men. Even though illegal and punishable with imprisonment, the lack of everyday integration between the sexes has lent itself to a general and subtle tolerance toward male effeminate behavior. Platonic affection between Moroccan males — such as holding hands, which is a sign of friendship and respect — is freely shown, and some of the Berber tribes (the Atlas Chleuh, for example) are known as particularly tolerant toward homosexual behavior. Lesbianism is relatively uncommon and definitely not acknowledged, as it portrays a weakness in both the woman — she’s expected to get married and bear children — and her family.

For both gays and lesbians, discretion is advised. Avoid public displays of affection, as this is something that is even frowned upon when shown by a heterosexual couple. Tangier — the world’s first gay resort — is still considered somewhat gay-friendly. Marrakech certainly has a mini gay scene, thanks largely to the number of gay French couples now residing there.

The IGLTA;800/448-8550 (bear-magazine.com) is a gay-owned travel, news, and culture website focused on les-bi-gay-trans life in countries around the world. Their exposé and other stories on gay life in Morocco are very interesting and well researched.

The following travel guides are available at many bookstores, or you can order them from any online bookseller: Spartacus International Gay Guide guides (bear-magazine.com), with separate annual books for gay men and lesbians.

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.

Lgbt holidays in morocco

Morocco is one of the safest countries in Africa for LGBT travellers, and our tips below will help you understand local attitudes, taboos and laws. LGBT holidays in Morocco are not about discovering the gay scene, but about the rich local culture, mountain and desert landscapes, and ancient cities. LGBT-savvy operators can help you discover this country regardless of your orientation.

A giant online outing campaign is underway in morocco

A mass campaign is taking place in Morocco in these hours: some people are publicly revealing the sexual orientation of gay and bisexual men without their consent. This started a few days ago, after Sofia Taloni, a Moroccan influencer living in Turkey, published a live video on Instagram. Taloni encouraged Moroccan girls to start a hunt for homosexuals through three dating apps: PlanetRomeo, Grindr and Hornet. The influencer gave his [read the note] followers specific instructions on how to search for these applications and how to behave once inside: he even suggested using fake photos and describing themselves as bottom men to more easily attract users.

This turned into a real witch hunt. Several girls signed up for the apps, they have started several conversations in which they asked for face – and even nude – pictures. The aim of all this was to divulge those users’ photos on various social media, especially in Arab female groups on Facebook. This phenomenon, according to several reports, is having very serious consequences within the LGBTQIA Moroccan community, both in virtual life and – even more – in real life: several boys have been kicked out of home, others have lost their jobs and unfortunately, news (not yet confirmed) of suicides are spreading.

Gay guide morocco

Homosexuality is illegal and is punishable under Article 489 of the Criminal Code with 6 months to 3 years imprisonment and a fine. Unlike in many countries, lesbian sex is also expressly prohibited. In 2016, a case caused worldwide outrage: two girls were arrested in Marakkech after a cousin had taken a photo of them kissing. There were campaigns in social media to help the two. In early December 2016 they were finally acquitted. Although the laws are only applied sporadically, they are intended to enable the government to control the queer community. The names of anyone who is arrested on charges of homosexual acts will be published – regardless of whether they are really gay or not. That these laws are also to be taken seriously by foreigners also is shown by an incident in 2014, when a gay British man was sentenced to four months in prison but released after protests by the British government. Morocco has a male and Muslim culture – as in many parts of the Muslim world, value is placed on the preservation of patriarchy and traditional gender roles, which is why the population is very critical of the queer community. The discrepancy between affluent tourism, oftern of European origin, and the local culture leads to a intricate situation for homosexual tourists – one could be lulled into a false sense of security. Sometimes men flirt openly and male prostitutes offer their services, money often plays an important part. Nevertheless, one should be especially careful, since the whole thing might just be a front, intended to conceal the purpose of blackmail. There is no recognition of same-sex partnerships and no protection against discrimination based on sexual identity or orientation. There is only one organisation working on behalf of the local community: Kif-Kif, which also runs a queer magazine, although it has to be printed in Spain. However, the government does not ban the magazine, nor the association – there are also some reports of Kif-Kif having educational seminars getting official funding. There have been more efforts in general in this North African country since the Arab Spring to create a more open culture.

Gay in morocco: “a relative of mine ambushed me on grindr”

Read also: A Giant Online Outing Campaign is Underway in Morocco

Sofia Taloni gave precise instructions during a live broadcast with over 100 thousand people, which was recorded, shared and made viral. I myself have been a victim of his [read the note] actions. Unfortunately, I got stuck in Morocco because of the coronavirus. I have no problems with my parents, I’m lucky, I know that. My parents know about my homosexuality and respect me.

A few days ago, I was contacted on Grindr by a family member. The message said: “I found you. My mother always suspected you were not a real man. And now I have proof! I will publish your photos on social media, so everyone will know. I will disgrace you publicly!” I got scared and didn’t reply to the message. I immediately removed my photos from the app.

I’ve seen many chat screenshots and photos of men posted on Facebook left at the mercy of the haters. I am afraid. I’ve already experienced such a thing in the past, when my cousin published photos of me everywhere so I’ve immediately searched all Facebook groups and pages, but I haven’t found anything for now.

NoteIf you search for Sofia Taloni on Google, you will find a female image. To avoid misunderstandings, we clarify that we use the masculine to describe him, to respect the fact that he feels like a gay man.

Chadi (fancy name)testimony collected by Anas Chariaitranslation by Barbara Burgio©2020 Il Grande Colibrìimage: elaboration from Pixabay (CC0)

Morocco instagram influencer apologises for role in outing of gay men

LONDON/TUNIS (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – A transgender Instagram influencer blamed for a wave of homophobic attacks in Morocco apologised on Wednesday for encouraging her followers to download dating apps that were then used to locate and publicly out gay men.

Naoufal Moussa – known online as Sofia Taloni – told her 620,000 followers in Instagram livestreams to download apps to locate gay men, a move she said aimed to show how many people were gay in the Islamic country and “humanize” homosexuality.

But instead Moroccan men on gay dating apps were tricked by potential dates into sharing intimate photos that were posted online, LGBT+ rights groups said, with some bullied, blackmailed and thrown out of family homes during coronavirus lockdowns.

Moussa said she regretted her advice was used to “target gay men instead of bringing them closer to the mainstream society” in Morocco where homosexuality is illegal.

She added her intention was never to out gay men, with increasing numbers using dating apps as the coronavirus pandemic has closed gay bars and other LGBT+ spaces globally.

“My intention was to ‘humanize’, ‘un-demonize’ and ‘normalize’ gay people in Morocco so we stop thinking of them as outcasts,” Moussa told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in an email interview.

“I literally wanted people to think of gay people as the man or woman next door and to stop the negative fantasy about who gay people are, how they look like and how they live.”

Now based in Turkey, Moussa grew up in Morocco and worked as a model before transitioning from male to female and embarking on a career as an Instagram beauty influencer. Her nightly Instagram broadcasts regularly attracted up to 100,000 viewers.

Moussa’s Instagram and Facebook accounts were suspended in April by Facebook, with the social media company saying it would not allow anyone to out members of the LGBT+ community.

Following the outing campaign, Human Rights Watch (HRW) called on the Moroccan government to repeal the section of its constitution that punishes same-sex relations.

“The real problem with such homophobic campaigns, regardless of how they were instigated, is that Morocco’s anti-LGBT law encourages them, if not incubates them,” HRW spokesman Ahmed Benchemsi said by email on Wednesday.

Local LGBT+ rights groups, including Nassawiyat, set up online resources, such as counselling, to help those at risk.

One Moroccan gay man in his early twenties, who did not wish to be identified, said it was “a sign of maturity”.

“If she apologized then it is an admission of the suffering of minorities due to her actions,” he said.

However, a spokesman for Nassawiyat said Moussa had not gone far enough and she should use her fan base more to “raise awareness about homosexuality and transexuality”.

“We aren’t against (Moussa) but she harmed a lot of people. We have a real problem with the system and how it builds monsters and internalized homophobia and transphobia,” he said.

Reporting by Hugo Greenhalgh @hugo_greenhalgh and Abdulla Al-Khal @AbdullaAlKhal; Editing by Belinda Goldsmith; Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers the lives of people around the world who struggle to live freely or fairly. Visit bear-magazine.com

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

All quotes delayed a minimum of 15 minutes. See here for a complete list of exchanges and delays.

Gay in morocco

Morocco is often considered one of the most liberal Muslim countries.

„It is forbidden by our God , it is haram “ explains Hasnae Krimi, 22, a student in linguistics at the University Mohammed V in Rabat. It also believes that the increase in natural disasters and disease are all warnings calling to reject homosexuality. Most people living in Muslim countries respond the same way: homosexuality is haram, forbidden by God.

Under Moroccan law, „committing obscene acts against nature with an individual of the same sex is punishable by six months to three years in prison and a fine ranging from 200 to 1,000 dirhams (Article 489 Code penal Marocaine)

„Behind this law against homosexuality, there is above the weight of religion,“ said Dr. Abdessamad Dialmy, professor of gender studies at the University Mohammed V in Rabat, and a leading researcher on sexuality in Morocco . „For most Moroccans, homosexuality is a sin because it is rejected by Islam. Having sex outside of marriage is less reprehensible than making love with someone of the same sex. The first is simply a sin, not abnormal, while the latter is considered a deviant. “ Source: /bear-magazine.com 

„Dans le sillage des ‘révolutions’ homosexuelles de par le monde et à la veille de la célébration, le 17 mai prochain, de la journée mondiale de lutte contre l’homophobie et la transphobie, les homos marocains appellent à manifestation publique pour leurs ‘droits’. Lemag 4 Mai 2013

Les homosexuels marocains se révoltent contre les islamistes, et appellent à manifester….. Source: bear-magazine.com

Gay guide morocco

Homosexuality is illegal and is punishable under Article 489 of the Criminal Code with 6 months to 3 years imprisonment and a fine. Unlike in many countries, lesbian sex is also expressly prohibited. In 2016, a case caused worldwide outrage: two girls were arrested in Marakkech after a cousin had taken a photo of them kissing. There were campaigns in social media to help the two. In early December 2016 they were finally acquitted. Although the laws are only applied sporadically, they are intended to enable the government to control the queer community. The names of anyone who is arrested on charges of homosexual acts will be published – regardless of whether they are really gay or not. That these laws are also to be taken seriously by foreigners also is shown by an incident in 2014, when a gay British man was sentenced to four months in prison but released after protests by the British government. Morocco has a male and Muslim culture – as in many parts of the Muslim world, value is placed on the preservation of patriarchy and traditional gender roles, which is why the population is very critical of the queer community. The discrepancy between affluent tourism, oftern of European origin, and the local culture leads to a intricate situation for homosexual tourists – one could be lulled into a false sense of security. Sometimes men flirt openly and male prostitutes offer their services, money often plays an important part. Nevertheless, one should be especially careful, since the whole thing might just be a front, intended to conceal the purpose of blackmail. There is no recognition of same-sex partnerships and no protection against discrimination based on sexual identity or orientation. There is only one organisation working on behalf of the local community: Kif-Kif, which also runs a queer magazine, although it has to be printed in Spain. However, the government does not ban the magazine, nor the association – there are also some reports of Kif-Kif having educational seminars getting official funding. There have been more efforts in general in this North African country since the Arab Spring to create a more open culture.

Location: Northwestern Africa Initials: MAR International country code: 212 (omit 0 from area code) International access code: 00 (wait for tone) Language: Arabic, Berber Dialects, French Currency: 1 Dirham (DH) = 100 Centimes Population: 32,521,000 Capital: Rabat Religions: 99 % Muslims (90% Sunnite Muslems) Climate: Mediterranean climate, hot in the interior. In the lowlands the cooler months are from Dec-Feb.

Behind closed doors marrakech, morocco

The airport doors slide open and my senses are bombarded. It’s utter chaos, a combination of children crying and adults screaming in Arabic. I swear I hear goats. Car horns sing, and there’s a weird whizzing sound that I can’t quite figure out; almost like the car from ‘The Jetsons’. This was supposed to be an escapist holiday, a getaway to celebrate my partner Damian’s 40th birthday, a world away from the circus that is our home town of Los Angeles.

Eventually, we find a cute Moroccan guy, holding a sign with our misspelt names on it. He seems excited to have found us and leads us to the pick-up area. I relax momentarily and let my guard down, but then he says goodbye and leaves us with another hip local. They banter somewhat aggressively in Arabic. I’m nervous and my guard is right up again, but I shrug it off and get in the van. If it comes down to it, we’re two Angelinos against one Moroccan.

A few minutes later we’re on a giant road heading for the Medina. It is dark out, but the roads are terrifyingly busy. I recall driving through Tijuana, Mexico as a child with my parents; we’d spend long weekends on the beaches of Baja. In the 90s, Mexico didn’t have the prestige it does now, but nevertheless my flashback calms me – nothing went wrong back then, so why should it now? I identify the mysterious whizzing sound – I discover small motorbikes are the primary mode of transport for locals. They envelope our minivan, weaving in and out of the increasingly dense traffic, some carrying livestock, others whole families on a single bike.

Our driver is lost. He circles around a few times before finally pulling up to a cul-de-sac and mumbling something we assume to mean, “be right back.” Adrenalin flows through my veins. He fetches an old man, casually lounging next to a wheelbarrow, and returns to the van saying, “we are here, I cannot go any further, this man he will help you.” 

This story first appeared in The Marvellous Marrakech Issue, available in print and digital.Subscribe today or purchase a back copy via our online shop.

We step out of the van and the majesty and chaos of the medina unfurl before us. However, we quickly note the old man is carting our luggage away in the wheelbarrow. I may have lost my patience, but I’ll be damned if I’m going lose my suitcase too. After half an hour’s search, the old man stops and shrugs. “Riad Al Moussika,” we keep repeating to this makeshift porter, but, unable to communicate with us he enlists a group of young guys loitering outside of a hammam. Here we go, I think to myself. We’ve walked straight into an obvious tourist-fleecing situation. People had warned me against asking for directions from men hanging around the Medina. Inevitably, you’ll be relieved of a dirham or ten for the pleasure, as they lead you somewhere you didn’t want to go, like a cheesy gift store or smelly tannery tour.

A good-looking, young man who speaks English approaches us and asks us if we want a massage. For a second, I think he’s getting fresh – but he can’t be, not out in the open like this, in a Muslim country with a pack of brutish-looking men behind him. The young loiterer beckons us to follow him around the corner; offering us a well-rehearsed menu of tours he could offer. but walks us right back to where we started. I’ve had it. He senses my discomfort and stops in his tracks and asks for some cash. Right there, I imagine things getting difficult. “Listen,” I say; my irate American starting to show, “all we want to do is to get to our Riad. Al. Moussika. R-i-a-d.” 

He laughs, steps aside and pushes open an intricately carved wooden door. He shrugs and says, “it’s ok, a tip is not obligatory,” and leaves us at the door, waiting just long enough to eye-roll the old porter before skipping off into the night.

Inside the Riad Al Moussika, everything changes. The man checking us in is incredibly sweet; he pushes the doors shut to silence the chaotic Medina, and pours us Moroccan mint tea. Considering my experience so far, I appreciate the gesture much more profoundly than expected. The Riad is beautiful, like something out of a storybook. They’ve reserved us a secret room with tons of privacy. With no elevator, we carry our baggage up three flights of stairs, across a gorgeous terrace and down three narrow winding flights. He opens a pair of antique French doors onto a lovely boudoir, with a King bed – a good sign. I had prepared an alibi in case we were asked why two clearly unrelated men wanted to share a room, but thankfully, I didn’t need to use it.

In the morning, I wake up questioning my decision to visit a country that criminalises homosexuality. I am relieved to feel welcome in the Riad, and reassure myself that if all else fails, I would be happy staying in the safety of the gorgeous property for the entire trip. But Damian is up early, ready to explore.

From: Los Angeles, USA | From, from: California, USA | Traveller type: Culturalist

Being gay in morocco

Hi,I am thinking of travelling to morocco sometime this year and would like some advice on specific places with the WOW factor old/new of interest ( must visit/see )also as a single gay man safe but interesting gay places to visit. I have not decided yet which part of morocco to visit first or what time of year but possibly 10-14 bear-magazine.com to recap: places of interest,great hotels( but reasonably priced) gay bars/coffee bars.i also love to people watch.( steady now ) lolol. So any help at all would be appreciated.

for previous threads on this topic. Welcome to the Morocco forum.

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There are a lot of things that are ‚officially illegal‘ in Morocco due to religious influence – however that does not mean that the law is always actively enforced.

For example, Morocco produces 35 million bottles of wine a year plus several brands of local beer exist. It is officially illegal for a local to drink any yet you will find bars packed with locals drinking alcohol everynight in all the major cities and beyond.

that being said, you should refrain from displaying your sexuality in public and you will not find any gay bars – however note that a city like Marrakech is known for being liberal and there are clubs which are ‚gay friendly‘.

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Morocco

Morocco is a country located in North Africa with a population of nearly 34 million. Morocco is the only country in Africa that is not currently a member of the African Union. Morocco is a de jure constitutional monarchy with an elected parliament. The King of Morocco, with vast executive powers, can dissolve government and deploy the military. As is true in many former African colonies, the Moroccan economy remains heavily dependent on the export of raw materials as well as increasing tourism. Morocco criminalizes “lewd or unnatural acts with an individual of the same sex.” Homosexuality is illegal and can be punished with anything from 6 months to 3 years imprisonment but the law is seldom enforced and homosexual activity is secretly common, especially in the holiday resorts. Relationships are often visibly displayed and money often plays a role where sex is involved. In the native community homosexuality remains a taboo and is considered immoral. Also see: Islam and Homosexuality

Morocco safe for identifiably gay men?

My same-sex partner and I are considering a trip to Morocco, but I have a nagging worry that it will not be safe for us. I think that I am not obviously gay. I do not think that it occurs to most Americans that I am because my speech and mannerisms are not recognizably gay. On the other hand, my partner has a voice with a higher-than-average pitch. When he speaks to strangers on the phone, they often address him as „ma’am“. His mannerisms sometimes also give him away. We have been living together for 8 years and are legally married, and I think that our body language might give us away as a couple. We know not to make any public display of affection in Morocco, but the way we naturally stand next to each other, the way we are attuned to each other might be noticeable. My partner and I both dress conservatively and have short hair, so we would not stand out visually. We also would plan to request rooms with two beds so as not to offend Moroccan sensibilities. Still, I worry that people, and in particular young men who are capable of violence, might figure us out and target us. Am I right to be worried? Thanks in advance.

I met a number of very obviously gay men during my time in Morocco, including some Moroccans. Indeed, Morocco is one of only two places in the world where I have ever been propositioned for gay sex on the street. I’m not gay myself, and am not an expert on the scene, but Morocco has long had a reputation for being one of the more gay-friendly places on the planet.

I suppose you might want to be a little careful where you sleep (at least in out of the way places), but if you stick to the main tourist towns, the only problem you’re likely to have if anyone notices that you’re gay is frequent harassment from touts wanting to take you to a hammam for a special „Berber massage“. And I would be very surprised if places like Fes and Marrakesh didn’t have gay-friendly hotels.

As above. ..I have gay friends living in Casablanca, and they seem to have no problems bear-magazine.com is an open gay scene.

Probably not the same in small towns and villages, but I guess you will be visiting tourist places?

A friend knowing I contribute on TT told me to always check Purple bear-magazine.com they’re bear-magazine.com(other advice (save money by flying United Airlines) was SO bear-magazine.com one’s perfect)

Thanks for these responses. We would hope to visit both Marrakech and Fes, which I guess are „tourist places“, but we would also want to see Ait Ben Haddou, and maybe Azgd and the Erg Chigaga (I was intrigued by this operator: bear-magazine.com). Also, because I am a hiker, maybe a night or two in Imlil.

When we travel, we do not like to stick to a gay ghetto. We are not particularly interested in the gay „scene“. We are a happy monogamous couple not looking for romantic adventure, and we find local straight people just as interesting as local gay people. We like to get a little off the beaten track at least once during a trip. We would rather not be restricted to „gay friendly“ lodging because we have found that often it commands a premium price without offering corresponding quality. In most places we have been, this has not been an issue, because hotel owners do not care who you are as long as you are a good, paying guest. Is Morocco a place where we would really have to confine ourselves to the few places that have advertised themselves as „gay friendly“? Would we have to confine ourselves to the big, touristed cities? Thanks again.

I’ve seen guys sharing rooms in Morocco a lot, and in all sorts of places from cheap hostels to more highbrow places. Lots of western male travellers will share rooms, both straight and gay, and I’ve never heard of an issue. I don’t think the gay couples advertised the fact they were gay so I suppose they just blended in to the numerous other guys sharing rooms.

My fella travelled around Morocco with 2 male friends and they always shared a room together (often with a double bed), or in a two and a single room, and they travelled to both touristy and out-of-the-way places and no one batted an eyelid.

I find Morocco to be a surprisingly tolerant country, and though conservative at heart they have a history of tolerance towards visitors. Like anywhere in the world though, there’s always a small contingency that may pass comment or give you a second glance, but as others have suggested it’s more than likely to lead to a proposition than an insult.

I’m pretty sure you’ll attract a lot less attention than you expect and find no difficulties in getting a room.

Let us know how your experience was when you get back so we can confirm our ramblings aren’t too far off the mark and reassure others with similar questions.

I’m with kate88, I don’t think that you are going to be anymore restricted in your travels in Morocco than a straight couple would be. In the main tourist cities, I don’t think you’re going to have an issue at all. My suggestion of gay-friendly hotels was because I thought you might feel more comfortable there, not because I think you ought to restrict yourselves to such hotels for any reason. In the regular, cheap hotels that I stayed at in Fes and Marrakesh, I’m sure you guys would have been perfectly welcome.

In smaller, out of the way places, you might not want to be that open about your homosexuality, but as kate points out, that’s unlikely to stop you even from sharing a room together (and in really out-of-the-way places in Morocco, you’ll often be sleeping on a rooftop or in a courtyard anyway, rather than a room!).

If you’re a hiker, you may well enjoy more than 2 days around Imlil, not to mention other mountain areas of the country. Morocco is a fabulous country for hiking.

Thanks to both of you. This is very reassuring. I think this means we will be going, insha’allah!

i met many gays tourists in my town and never claimed that they are or they have bad experience and all what is important during your jounrey to Morocco is to not to kiss each other on the streets or try to provique Moroccans culture and religion , all hotels don’t care about gays having one double bed . hide your intimity and your acts as gays in public places in order not to hurt locals and enjoy your vacations in Morocco

Lgbt vacations in morocco

Morocco is one of the safest countries in Africa for LGBT travelers, and our tips below will help you understand local attitudes, taboos and laws. LGBT vacations in Morocco are not about discovering the gay scene, but about the rich local culture, mountain and desert landscapes, and ancient cities. LGBT-savvy operators can help you discover this country regardless of your orientation.

Gay privatzimmer und unterkünfte in tanger-tetouan, morocco

Entdecke mit misterb&b eine einladendere Welt. Von privaten Zimmern und Apartments bis hin zu LGBTQ-freundlichen Hotels bietet sich dir die Möglichkeit, entweder im Herzen der Schwulenviertel oder in anderen Stadtteilen der von dir besuchten Städte zu übernachten. Ein Loft in Soho, ein Mehrbettzimmer in Barcelona oder im Castro, ein schwulenfreundliches Hotel im Marais oder in Chelsea – erlebe misterb&b in allen schwulen Reisezielen! Aktiviere die Verbindungsoption in deinem Profil und verbinde dich mit anderen misterb&b-Reisenden an deinem Reiseziel oder in deinem Hotel! misterb&b is not affiliated, endorsed, or otherwise associated with Airbnb.

Popular gay destinations in morocco

With misterb&b, experience a more welcoming world. From private rooms and apartments to LGBTQ-friendly hotels, you have the option to stay in the heart of gay districts as well as other neighborhoods in the places you visit. A loft in Soho, a shared room in BarcelonaLe Marais or in Chelsea, experience misterb&b in all gay travel destinations! Activate the connection option on your profile and connect with other misterb&b travelers at your destination city or hotel! Problems with misterb&b? Please refer to our Help Center. misterb&b is not affiliated, endorsed, or otherwise associated with Airbnb.

Homepage / moroccoryad

If Morocco remains a country very much inked in a tradition unfavorable to gays and lesbians there are still cities much appreciated by gay tourists for many years like Marrakech, Taroudant or Essaouira. With Gay Sejour find the best gay addresses to organize your trip to Morocco. Thanks to the network and the link created by Gay Sejour, we can guarantee to our guests the reliability, the quality, the authenticity and the friendliness gay and gay friendly of our reception and our programs in Morocco.

Morocco is different. Ethnic diversity, colour and contrast creates a holiday destination for everyone, whether you are a seasoned traveller, an adventurer, a trekker, a shopper, a big city escapist, weary of your office, seek sunshine and smiling faces, love to photograph, paint, dance, enjoy music, or simply want to feel the warm sand on your feet and slow down to bear-magazine.com your holiday unfolds you will find yourself caught in Morocco’s splendor. Wandering through the medina, you will hear the wail of the Muezzin calling the faithful to prayer, and „balek! balek!“, the cry of a donkey cart driver warning you out of their way. In the market, jewel colours of indigo, saffron and henna dazzle in beautiful carpets. In Marrakech’s Djemaa El Fna square you can dance with the bellydancers, have your fortune told, pay a scribe to write a letter, watch the acrobats and be mesmerised by the flute that charms the viper. Relax in a streetside cafe and taste exotic spice in your food, and mint in your tea. Take care! Elegant ancient mosques and minarets, opulent palaces and the stark beauty of the sunrise among towering kasbahs in the Sahara desert are waiting for you.

In Sahara time slows to the pace of your camel, softly shuffling across the dunes to the oasis. Watch the moonrise, your world will fall away and you will be caught in the aura of mystery that pervades this land. The desert nomads, like their camels, are in no hurry. Where is there to go? The desert has a timeless quality – go with it and you will begin to understand. Here is a land where something forgotten lives on.

Morocco is different. Ethnic diversity, colour and contrast creates a holiday destination for everyone, whether you are a seasoned traveller, an adventurer, a trekker, a shopper, a big city escapist, weary of your office, seek sunshine and smiling faces, love to photograph, paint, dance, enjoy music, or simply want to feel the warm sand on your feet and slow down to bear-magazine.com your holiday unfolds you will find yourself caught in Morocco’s splendor. Wandering through the medina, you will hear the wail of the Muezzin calling the faithful to prayer, and „balek! balek!“, the cry of a donkey cart driver warning you out of their way. In the market, jewel colours of indigo, saffron and henna dazzle in beautiful carpets. In Marrakech’s Djemaa El Fna square you can dance with the bellydancers, have your fortune told, pay a scribe to write a letter, watch the acrobats and be mesmerised by the flute that charms the viper. Relax in a streetside cafe and taste exotic spice in your food, and mint in your tea. Take care! Elegant ancient mosques and minarets, opulent palaces and the stark beauty of the sunrise among towering kasbahs in the Sahara desert are waiting for you.

In Sahara time slows to the pace of your camel, softly shuffling across the dunes to the oasis. Watch the moonrise, your world will fall away and you will be caught in the aura of mystery that pervades this land. The desert nomads, like their camels, are in no hurry. Where is there to go? The desert has a timeless quality – go with it and you will begin to understand. Here is a land where something forgotten lives on.

gay morocco–myths and realities 2015

Introduction: Morocco is an ancient civilization steeped in history and hormones, a gold mine for the archeologist and psychologist. If you go looking for the gay ‘scene’ in Morocco, you won’t find it, and if you’re not looking, guy-sex situations will likely unfold. Paradoxical and elusive, male sexuality in Morocco is veiled, ambiguous in meaning, easily bisexual and not used for identity.

gay cruise ship forbidden morocco landing

Editorial Comment: Gay Cruise Ship Forbidden Morocco Landing This is a story of a forbidden cruise ship landing and the homophobia whipped up by local media despite no official government ban. After the incident Morocco’s Tourism Minister Lahcen Haddad said “no official decision had been made to prevent the ship from stopping in Morocco.” Too

courageous gay magazine ‘mithly’ debuts in morocco

Despite Islamist hostility and a restrictive legal climate, homosexuals in Morocco are publishing a magazine that covers issues in their community and beyond. Posted by Richard Ammon bear-magazine.com May 27, 2010 By Imane Belhaj Magharebia News Casablanca [bear-magazine.com] Magazine Mithly (Gay) published its first edition in April but has not applied for a government li

A powerful influencer

Sofia Taloni has irresponsibly urged girls to find their relatives on gay dating apps. The influencer, in an interview released shortly after his live video, claimed that in doing so, he wanted to unmask the hypocrisy of Moroccan men: according to him, the end justifies the means and the repressed gays who attack him in the comments below his posts are hypocrites, because in the meanwhile, they have clandestine love or sexual relations with other men.

In order to break the taboo of homosexuality and to make Moroccan citizens aware that LGBTQIA people exist even in Morocco, Taloni provided haters with specific instructions on how to frame gay chat users. All this is even more serious because he’s an influencer with over 600,000 followers, he is well known and he is a friend with many Moroccan and Arab celebrities. Surprisingly, several show-business personalities are strongly defending Taloni’s choice, completely ignoring the lives of LGBTQIA people who are locked up with their families in a quarantined Morocco, and the violence that could arise from this campaign.

Disturbing silences

In the last few hours, many activists and people from the LGBTQIA community started a successful large-scale reporting of Sofia Taloni’s Instagram profile: the profile was deleted because it didn’t comply with Instagram’s Community Standards, but the influencer opened new profiles. PlanetRomeo sent a message to all Moroccan users and eliminated the profiles created after Taloni’s live video. Grindr has alerted their users, too, suggesting to not share personal pictures and data, and providing a helpline number to call if someone is facing dramatic consequences from his outing.

There is still no certain data on the consequences of this outing campaign: we will know more about the consequences of Taloni’s reckless action in the next hours and days. They won’t be happy news: several telephone hotlines and support networks have already been activated. The LGBTQIA community is in extreme danger and doesn’t even have the protection of law enforcement and the judicial system: Morocco is one of 70 countries that still imprisons homosexuals. Article 489 of the penal code punishes homosexuality with a sentence ranging from 6 months to 3 years of imprisonment and a fine from 120 to 1200 dirhams (11-110 euros; 12-120 dollars).

Stop mass outing

In this gloomy and complex picture both the media and social media users have to be very careful not to involuntarily perform actions that could cause dramatic consequences; we are referring to the mistakes made with Patrick Zaky, a social activist in prison in Egypt that some Italian gay media described (it isn’t known on what basis) as an LGBTQIA activist and/or a homosexual man, offering on a silver platter to the authoritarian government of Abdel Fattah al-Sisi not just the umpteenth accusation, but above all an accusation useful to hide the real purposes of the judicial persecution.

It is essential that no one, from websites to social users, names names and surnames of the current and future victim of the treacherous game of Taloni: sharing photos, videos, messages or even links to pages showing photos, videos and messages aids the media pillory in progress, even if it is done to denounce what is happening. Whoever finds this material on their Facebook, YouTube or Instagram boards should only report it.

We have to remember that we are facing a country that does not protect LGBTQIA people: no desire for a scoop and no desire to show indignation is worth someones’s life and freedom. Sharing these materials means becoming co-authors of this mass outing.

NoteIf you search for Sofia Taloni on Google, you will find a female image. To avoid misunderstandings, we clarify that we use the masculine to describe him, to respect the fact that he feels like a gay man.

Adam Alaoui and Anas Chariaitranslation by Pier Cesare Notaro©2020 Il Grande ColibrìImages: elaboration from pxfuel (CC0) / Il Grande Colibrì / Il Grande Colibrì

Gay travel index

Amsterdam Bangkok Barcelona Berlin Bremen Brighton Brussels Buenos Aires Chicago Columbus Denver D�sseldorf Frankfurt Freiburg Hannover Hamburg K�ln Las Vegas Lisbon London Los Angeles Manchester Mannheim Melbourne Miami Beach Minneapolis Montr�al M�nchen New Orleans New York Orlando Palm Springs Paris Perth Philadelphia Phuket Praha Rome San Diego San Francisco Stuttgart Toronto Vancouver Wien Z�rich

Kif-kif (organization)

Kif-Kif (The Association of Lesbians, Gays, Transsexuals and Bisexuals of Morocco) is an NGO and LGBT rights organization for LGBT Moroccans. Since it was illegal in Morocco the organization was licensed and checked in Spain since 2008. On its constitutive act, it is mentioned that its actions include both Spain and Morocco. Although its focus is on homosexual rights, membership is open to everyone who shares its values based on the universal declaration of human rights.

The association is violently criticized from very conservative parts of Muslim society.

Kif-kif is an Amazigh expression that means „same“. The organization also operates a magazine titled Mithly.

The Issue of Homosexuality Is Changing Moroccan Society (bear-magazine.com)

SEXUAL BEHAVIORS AND PRACTICES IN MOROCCO (I) HOMOSEXUALITY

How Morocco became a haven for gay Westerners in the 1950s ( BBC World Service 12 October 2014)

Lgbtq+ travel tips for morocco

As a conservative Muslim country where homosexuality is illegal, there aren’t any official “gay hot spots” or LGBTQ+ celebrations. That’s not to say that gay-friendly bars, restaurants, night clubs or beaches do not exist. In urban centers like Tangier, Marrakech and Agadir, it’s possible to find gay-friendly accommodations and spots that welcome a mix of gay and straight visitors. Self-proclaimed as the “best club in Morocco,” Pacha Marrakech is part of the international club chain and caters to a mixed audience. The Tangier Inn located within the Hotel El Muniria is a long-standing nightclub in Tangier that draws in a liberal crowd. In the beach town of Agadir, the Flamingo Oriental Night Club brings in a mix of locals and tourists and is busiest on the weekends.

Gay gruppenreise: portugal und marokko explorer

Nehmen Sie an einer schwulen Gruppenreise teil und entdecken Sie Portugal und Marokko. Unser Abenteuer beginnt in Portugal, wo Sie die Stadt Porto entdecken. Diese Stadt hat im Grunde den Hafen erfunden, also werden Trinker hier gut abschneiden! Es ist voller bunter charmanter Gebäude ….

View all morocco members

Morocco in one word is vibrant. From the white, snow-capped Atlas Mountains to the golden hues of the Sahara Desert to the lush green farms, travelers to this north African country are immersed in the vibrant colors of a geographically diverse nation. Setting foot in one of the ancient medinas will transport you to a world from the past: narrow streets with towering walls and markets (souks) full of artisan goods, spice-laden food and bustling crowds of people.

A sense of organized chaos fills your senses as streets are often shared by large tour buses, motorcycles, horse-drawn carts and pedestrians all at once. Some visitors may feel overwhelmed while others find this to be a thrilling adventure in a mystical land only seen on movie screens. Whichever your knee-jerk reaction might be, take a deep breath and brace yourself for exotic sights, sounds and smells as you begin your journey in the Kingdom of Morocco.

It’s important to note here that in Morocco homosexual acts are illegal and punishable by up to three years in prison. Even though this is not always enforced, it’s smart to use street sense and avoid PDAs (public displays of affection) as this is culturally frowned upon for both opposite and same-sex couples. As in any country, respect local customs and most people will not be hostile. Transgender travelers should be especially aware of potentially abusive behavior, particularly to transgender women, due in part to a lack of education in the country and conservative Muslim values.

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